¡We can no longer be a bunch of empty minds living in critical times refusing to recognize real lies!

Monday, 04 October 2010

MORE THAN 70 COUNTRIES MAKE BEING GAY A CRIME

A comprehensive study of global lesbian, bisexual and gay rights, seen by The Independent on Sunday, reveals the brutal – and, in many instances, fatal – price people pay around the globe for their sexuality. The research, which was conducted by the charity network the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA), shows that 76 countries still prosecute people on the grounds of their sexual orientation – seven of which punish same-sex acts with death.
On a global scale, the nations doing something positive for gay rights are dwarfed by those behaving negatively. While 75 countries will imprison you if you are gay, only 53 have anti-discrimination laws that apply to sexuality. Only 26 countries recognise same-sex unions.
In the 10 years since the IoS published its first Pink List, Britain has made impressive strides towards sexual equality. In a single decade of progress, gay people have the right to adopt children, an equal age of consent, legislation to protect them from discrimination and can even tie the knot in civil ceremonies.
But homophobia remains a scar on Britain's social landscape. Around the world, hundreds of people are killed every year just for being gay. Ben Summerskill, chief executive of the UK lesbian gay and bisexual rights organisation Stonewall, said: "We are mindful that however remarkable the progress we might be making in Britain is, there are countries around the world where people still live in fear of their lives just because of the way they were born. Helping to support them sensitively is a critical obligation of anyone who cares about human rights in the wider world."
The picture in many other parts of the world may make Britain look comparatively welcoming, especially on a day when we celebrate 100 influential figures who are open about their sexuality. But as the Prime Minister, David Cameron, writes today on page 39, the Pink List also reminds the UK not to sit on its laurels.
"As well as being a celebration, the Pink List is a challenge and a reminder that we must go further," he said. "Yes, the UK is a world leader for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality, but we cannot be complacent. As long as there are people out there feeling marginalised or threatened, we must continue to tackle prejudice."
The broadcaster Clare Balding, who last week was dismissed by the Sunday Times writer A A Gill as a "dyke on a bike", writes in today's paper that being gay in Britain "is still not plain sailing". She was told in a letter from The Sunday Times that the homophobic piece was equivalent to the criticism Jeremy Clarkson gets about his dress sense.
Mr Summerskill added that the key is to challenge prejudice. "People are still being murdered for their sexuality on the streets of London, which is meant to be the most progressive city in the country. When Jeremy Clarkson or Chris Moyles say 'What are you complaining about?', the answer is, 'Why don't you try walking down the high street holding hands with another man?'"
Social pressure to be "straight" in Britain has yet to be eliminated. When the X Factor winner Joe McElderry, 19, came out as gay yesterday, it was after previously feeling unable to admit his sexuality. Even when someone hacked into his Twitter account to "out" him last month, he still insisted he was straight. According to Stonewall, almost two-thirds of young lesbian, gay and bisexual people experience homophobic bullying in Britain's schools.
ILGA's study of global gay rights shows that, elsewhere, admitting to being gay is still a matter of life and death. In much of Africa, the past decade has seen the lives of gay people go "from bad to worse", the report says. More than 50 per cent of African states have taken action to criminalise homosexuality and religious homophobia is rife. The picture is not much brighter in Asia, where 23 countries have made being gay a crime.
Latin America and the Caribbean are also home to many governments with a similar outlook. In Jamaica, sex with another man is described in the statute book as an "abominable crime".
Widney Brown of Amnesty International lists sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and Eastern Europe as the regions which give them the greatest concern for gay rights. Ms Brown also warned against Western nations becoming complacent. "The US is the only country in Nato with a prohibition of being openly gay in the military."
Renato Sabbadini, co-secretary general of ILGA, said: "The unworthiness rests entirely on these states, for theirs is the shame of depriving a significant number of their citizens of dignity, respect and the enjoyment of equal rights."

16 comments:

  1. I agree with Wonder Man entirely. Thank you for making this information available to all of us, especially during GLBT History Month. Great blog, my friend!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Agreed! Information is always handy

    ReplyDelete
  3. thanks for posting this. my one question would be about the going rational that all queers were born that way. some of us asked ourselves questions about our choices when we realized we could choose, that there was space, however hidden, to make a choice. in my early twenties, once i realized that i could do what i wanted and that i didn't have to go with men just because that was what everyone seemed to expect, i realized that i hadn't thought about my sexuality at all. i had just done what was expected from elementary school on up. this is me saying i chose to be with wimmin and that i've always mindfully chosen since then to pursue a sexuality grounded in full consciousness of my humanness. there's a wonderful site i found years ago called queer by choice that is about people who are sort of like me, i guess, in that they also chose to embrace their sexualities against the heterosexual grain. some of us weren't born "that way". we were joyfully, sexually, juicily, consciously, intentionally made. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. things will change, slowly but surely

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm sick to death of hearing about gay victims and gay victim hood.
    Can we not find a single story to celebrate our sexuality and the incredibly diverse qualities it brings to a situation?
    Must everything be about injustice, death, and misery?
    Are these the only situations we can find to associate ourselves with?
    News flash fellow gays: We don't have the market cornered on suffering and injustice.
    I don't know any group of gays in my personal life actually affected by the kind of gay topics so frequently discussed in the blog-o-sphere nor are the gays I associate with weak, suicidal, or afraid.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Some places in the world lack humanity. It is so very sad that one's sexuality puts them in harm's way.

    I fear traveling back to Jamaica or South America seems things have gotten worst over the years. Africa is probably the most frightening of all places.

    There are laws on the book here in various States of the Americas that could land a person in the slammer for acting on their sexuality. Most of those laws are no longer enforced, but it does make gay, bisexual and transgender persons very uncomfortable knowing those laws could be used against them if the cops or courts choose to impose the charge.

    ReplyDelete
  7. DARK DAUGHTA - EVERY TIME I SEE OR READ STUFF FROM YOU, I OFTEN THINK THAT YOU WOULD MAKE A WONDERFUL PARTNER FOR A FEMALE I KNOW!

    ReplyDelete
  8. CORVE - THEY HAVE NO OTHER CHOICE!

    ReplyDelete
  9. COGENT - I GET WHAT YOU ARE SAYING & I FEEL THE SAME SOMETIMES, BUT I REALIZE THAT WE ARE ALL IN THIS WHETHER WE WANT TO BE OR NOT. INDIRECTLY OR DIRECTLY THE ACTIONS OF ONE AFFECTS US AS A WHOLE.

    ReplyDelete

THANK YOU FOR YOUR VOICE...

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails